Stephen Pace: Maine Master/Indiana Painter

Stephen Pace: Maine Master/Indiana Painter
Curriculum Guide
 
By Melody Lewis-Kane and Corliss Chastain

Red+Windjammer%2C+Green+Sea%2C+2007.jpg

Red windjammer, green sea, 2007

Watercolor on paper

 

The MAINE MASTERS PROJECT is an award-winning video series sponsored by the Union of Maine Visual Artists (www.UMVAonline.org), a not-for-profit educational organization established in 1975. The Maine Masters Project was begun in 1999 and has created an ongoing series of profiles of some of Maine’s most important and often less recognized visual artists who articulate the importance of art making. The series celebrates art making – it enhances our culture by encouraging people to think and feel more deeply.

Through our curriculum guide series that’s now been launched with the first curriculum guide on painter Stephen Pace, we are beginning an effort to reach a younger audience of high school and college students.

BIOGRAPHY


Stephen S. Pace

Born in 1918, Stephen Pace’s life has spanned most of the 20th and into the 21st century. His childhood years were spent with his family on farms in Missouri and Indiana and gave him a sense of the importance of family and hard work. Although he loved drawing throughout his childhood, his first formal art lessons were at the age of seventeen with Robert Lahr, a WPA artist from Evansville, Indiana. During this time, Pace began working with an architect doing architectural renderings and drafting. In 1939 a peacetime draft was instituted and Pace entered the Army as World War II loomed on the horizon. Along with designing posters for the Army, his architectural background was used to design buildings in the U.S. and England during the War. After the War but before returning to the U.S., Stephen continued painting in Paris encouraged by a commanding officer who admired his work and gave him the time to paint. It was there that he met Gertrude Stein and Pablo Picasso.

Four years in the Army entitled him to four years of education under the GI Bill, which he used in part to study art in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, where he met Milton Avery, one of his strongest influences and closest friends. From there he moved to New York City where his landscapes and figurative work gave way to the abstract expressionist movement of the 1950’s. Through his friendship with Milton Avery, Stephen met artists such as Franz Kline, Mark Rothko, Barnett Newman, Jackson Pollack and Willem deKooning and many others who studied with him at the Hans Hofmann School. Pace met and married his lifelong partner, Palmina, a NY art buyer, who devoted herself to Stephen and his work. In 1950 and 51 they traveled to Paris and Italy where Stephen continued his studies. He used the last eleven months of his GI Bill time to study at Hofmann’s schools in New York and Provincetown, MA. His large abstract expressionist paintings where exhibited in major galleries in New York City including seven Whitney Annual and Biennials.

Then in 1960 they began spending the first of twelve summers in rural Pennsylvania which made Stephen realize his need to get back to figurative painting. But their allegiance was gradually transferred to Maine where he and Pam would camp on longer vacations. In 1972 the Pace’s bought a house in Stonington, Maine, a small fishing village on Deer Isle. Summers in Maine provided abundant subject matter of beautiful land and seascapes and the working people of the village. 

After spending more than fifty years between Maine and New York, Stephen and Pam returned to his boyhood home of Southern Indiana where he lives and works in a studio on the campus of the University of Southern Indiana. He and Pam donated their Maine home to the Maine College of Art along with the paintings in that house. Many other paintings have been donated to the Evansville Museum and the University of Southern Indiana in Evansville, IN. There, at the age of 90, he continues his lifelong commitment to painting.

SYLLABUS

 

DESCRIPTION 
The study of the life and works of Stephen Pace introduces students to a life-long commitment to painting and the celebration of the artist’s personal world. Themes in Pace’s work include landscape, the figure, and symbolic imageryGenres to be studied include regional and personal environment and lifestyles of the people he paints. Stephen Pace’s work evolved from realism through pure abstraction to his personal style that involves figurative abstraction and a deliberate use of brushwork that has become his signature. Through the study of Pace’s work and inspirations, and an exploration of the student’s local environment, students will discuss related concepts and produce original, creative solutions to specific criteria.

GOALS & OBJECTIVES

Students will: 

•  View the DVD, “Stephen Pace: Indiana Painter/Stephen Pace: Maine Master” and complete
      Viewing and Post-Viewing Questions 
•  Discuss the concepts included in the DVD as well as related research and activities
•  Understand the historical perspective of Pace’s life
•  Make connections between Pace’s life and work with other artists and movements
•  Gain an appreciation for an artist’s life-long commitment to making art
•  Research and value the students’ local/regional environment
•  Create original, creative work based on an understanding of Pace’s influences, themes and 
      process


NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR VISUAL ARTS EDUCATION 9-12 
The lesson plans included in this syllabus address all six National Content Standards: 

1. Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes
2. Using knowledge of structures and functions
3. Choosing and evaluating a range of subject matter, symbols, and ideas
4. Understanding the visual arts in relation to history and cultures 
5. Reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others 
6. Making connections between visual arts and other disciplines


The National Content and Achievement Standards can be found on the National Art Education Association web site: http://www.arteducators.org/olc/pub/NAEA/store/store_page_9.html

ACTIVITIES

• View DVD: “Stephen Pace: Indiana Painter/Stephen Pace: Maine Master”:
• Complete
• Viewing Questions
• Post-viewing Questions 
•Lesson Plans for Paintings:
1. Abstracting The Regional Landscape: Articulating a Sense of Place
2. Abstracting The World of Work: Creating a Relationship With the Subject
3. The Family: Seeing the Extraordinary  


Activity Themes: Personal Environment & Experiences, Local Industry, Figurative Abstraction, Composition, Use of Color, Personal Style, Symbolic Imagery, Social Impact on Art

Additional Themes: Zen Philosophy/Painting, WPA, GI Bill, Abstract Expressionism, Post-Impressionism, Chinese Calligraphy, Japanese Brushwork

Supplemental Research - Influences on Stephen Pace’s Artistic Development: Gertrude Stein, Milton Avery, Franz Kline, Willem DeKooning, Hans Hoffman, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso.

VIEWING THE FILM: VIEWING & POST VIEWING QUESTIONS

Time: 45 - 80 min.

Objectives
Students will:
•  View the DVD on Stephen Pace
•  Understand the historical perspective of Pace’s life
•  Make connections between Pace’s life and work with other artists and movements
•  Discuss the artistic concepts included in the film
•  Gain an appreciation for an artist’s life-long commitment to making art
Materials and Equipment:
•  DVD projection system
•  Copies of viewing and post-viewing questions sheets for each student
Introduction: Teacher provides 5 - 10 min. (link to biography if needed)

Viewing/viewing questions: 35 min.
Students can be given a few minutes before the DVD to review the viewing questions and answer them while watching the DVD. 

Post-viewing questions: 15-40 min 
The post-viewing questions are more in-depth. Answers can be written and discussed in class or assigned as homework for later discussion. 

Assessment:
Students can be assessed on the understanding of the objectives for viewing the film through their participation in the discussion of the DVD and the quality of their answers to the viewing and post-viewing questions.

FILM VIEWING QUESTIONS
Please read the following questions and jot down ideas for your answers as you watch the DVD. Be prepared to discuss your answers after the viewing. 

Download and print a PDF of these questions.

1. What was Pace’s early family life like? Where did they live? What kind of work did they do?
2. What did the horses in Pace’s painting symbolize?
3. What was Pam Pace’s role in Pace’s life as an artist?
4. What is unique about Pace’s painting style? 

5. Why did Pace go to Mexico?
6. List three important things that happened to Pace when he went to New York.
7. What important artist became Pace’s friend in New York?
8. Why was Han Hofmann’s class in New York important in Pace’s artistic development?
9. What were the themes of Pace’s painting in Maine?

POST- VIEWING QUESTIONS
Please answer all the following questions thoughtfully and thoroughly. Either rewrite the questions or number the answers. However, do not exceed three pages. Please use your very best writing skills (edit carefully) – type, double-spaced. Due__________________

1. Why did Pace return to figurative painting after his abstract painting period in New York ?

2. What is the “sense of place” in Pace’s work and how does it influence his subject matter?

3. What does Pace mean by “I don’t paint what I see, I paint what I saw”? How does it affect his work?

4. Pace had a close community of artists in New York. How did that community affect his work there?

5. In what ways can any community of artists influence each other?

LESSON PLAN 1

ABSTRACTING THE REGIONAL LANDSCAPE: 
ARTICULATING A SENSE OF PLACE

Time: 10-14 hours

DESCRIPTION / OBJECTIVES:
Through a study of the local rural and/or urban environment, students will document and create imagery and compositions that reflect their personal knowledge of specific places. They will engage in a creative process that will lead to an original, abstract painting that addresses the subject with a selected painting medium using bold, symbolic brushstrokes to develop visual texture and forms. 

MATERIALS: 

•  Paper
• 4”x6” for 5-10 initial sketches, 
• 9”x12” for 3 preliminary paintings
• Heavy-weight 18”x24” for final painting•  or 18x24” Primed Canvas
•  Gesso for priming paper (optional) 
•  Pencil
•  Black India Ink (or paint)
•  Variety of Brushes: large bamboo, medium and large round & flat
•  Paint: Tempera or Acrylic 
•  Acrylic Matt Medium (if using Acrylic paint)
•  Masking Tape
•  Pace Painting Images (click a number to see the painting):
141314293844454648616364686970

PROCESS: 

•  Research and Document (3-5 hours)
•  Explore and examine the regional environment and geography: public records, field trips, web sites, and library resources. 

•  Take photographs and/or make sketches on site (5-10 sketches/photos).  

•  Draw what you saw! (1-1/2 hours)
•  Return to the Art Studio where they will create three, quick, 9”x12” sketches from photographs and on-site sketches. “I don’t paint what I see. I paint what I saw.” –S. Pace 

•  Identify and draw a contour line with a black fine-tip marker, or a bamboo brush and ink around the major positive and negative shapes in each of the sketches. Select three drawings that have harmonious compositions. Look for repeated or related shapes and lines, rhythm and balance. Explain your decisions to the class or smaller group. 

•  Abbreviate the texture with symbolic brushwork: (2-1/2 hours) •  Refer to the photographs and examine the major textures in the selected landscapes. Identify the patterns or repeated lines and shapes that create those textures. 

•  Create several, small contour line drawings of those shapes. “Recreate” those symbols with one stroke/mark. Use different size and shape paint brushes, and black paint (or ink) on a separate piece(s) of paper. Select the mark that best represents that symbol and repeat it, creating a “pattern”. The repeated symbolic marks will represent the essence of the original texture. 

•  Repeat the pattern of brushstrokes in the corresponding major shape(s) in your selected contour drawings. Create and assign symbolic marks/brushstrokes (textures) for all major landscape textures in each selected line drawing.

•   Create an original painting that reflects a personal style 
    “Well the first stroke really says who you are.” –S. Pace: (3-4 hours)

•  Select one of the three drawings. This landscape will be enlarged and “recreated” in color. Explain your decisions to the class or smaller group. 

•  Select a limited pallet, 2-4 colors, from specific color harmoniesComplementary, AnalogousTriadTetrad or Split-complement. Black and white may be used and mixed with pure hues to achieve tints and shades.

•  Practice the symbolic brushstrokes that represent the various textures with specific color(s) on a separate piece of paper. The larger format may require larger brushes for making marks.

•  Create the landscape painting on an 18”x24” format. The kind of paint may dictate the surface material (heavy white paper, primed canvas, gessoed paper). Tape paper to a flat surface allowing a 1/4”-1/2” border. The paint will be applied directly. No preliminary drawing on the canvas/paper (separate sketches only). The paint should be fluid. If it wants to drip, let it! Carefully remove the tape from the dry, completed painting. 

•  Compare the final 18”x24” painting and three 9”x12” paintings to the original line drawing and photograph.

•  A student many want to create more than one larger painting of other compositions.


OPTIONAL JOURNAL/NOTEBOOK:

•  The journal/notebook may be a document of the process that includes the initial photo or sketch, the contour drawings, all preliminary paintings, interviews, research, written documentation, and other writing activities.


OPTIONAL WRITING ACTIVITIES: (1/2 - 1 hour each)

•  Write a two-paragraph description of the landscape that prompted the painting.

•  Write a list of 10-15 adjectives, verbs and nouns that describe that landscape. Select six words from the list and write a five-line poem incorporating those six words.


OPTIONAL FIELD TRIP: 

•  Field trip to local museum or gallery to see Pace’s original works. See Sources/
Resources link for listing of museums and galleries.


STUDIO ENVIRONMENT : 

•  Students take an active responsibility in the learning environment:
•  Use time productively 
•  Be considerate of others in the class 
•  Participate appropriately in class discussions and group activities
•  Clean up workspace and equipment, and return materials to their proper place

EXHIBITION : 

•  Exhibit the work:
•  Display the completed painting with preliminary photograph/sketch and the journal/notebook

ASSESSMENT : 

•  Students should be assessed on the following:
•  Completion of DVD viewing and post-viewing assignments
•  Participation in related discussions
•  Completion of research and documentation
•  Completion of initial drawing and brushwork exercises
•  Level of completion of final painting(s):
•  Creative Process
•  Craftsmanship & Form
•  Demonstrated Understanding of Subject & Content
•  Effort & Progress•  Use of project-specific vocabulary
•  Appropriate use of time, materials and studio space

LESSON PLAN 2



ABSTRACTING THE WORLD OF WORK:
CREATING A RELATIONSHIP WITH THE SUBJECT 

Time: 11-18 hours

DESCRIPTION / OBJECTIVES:
Through a study of a variety of careers and work environments, students will document and create imagery and compositions that reflect their personal observations of people engaged in work. The compositions will emphasize the relationship of the figure with his/her environment. Students will engage in a creative process that will lead to an original, abstract painting that addresses the subject with a selected painting medium using bold brushstrokes to develop forms. 


MATERIALS: 

•  Paper
•  9”x12” for 5-8 preliminary paintings
•  Heavy-weight 18”x24” for final painting•  or Primed Canvas: 18”x24”
•  Gesso for priming paper (optional) 
•  Pencil
•  Black fine line marker
•  Variety of Brushes: large bamboo, medium and large round & flat
•  Paint: Tempera or Acrylic 
• Acrylic Matt Medium (if using Acrylic paint)
•  Masking Tape
•  Pace Painting Images: 12133746475758596061626566

PROCESS: 

1.Research and Document regional industry (3-6 hours)
•  Interview family and/or community members about their work
•  Visit sites of local industry
•  Participate in a job shadow
•  Take photographs or make sketches of people engaged in their work
•  Record information  

2. Draw what you saw! (1-1/2 hours)

•  Return to the Art Studio and create three, quick, 9”x12” sketches from photographs and on-site sketches. “I don’t paint what I see. I paint what I saw.” –S. Pace 
•  Select images or sections of the images – compositions that use the space effectively. Look for repeated or similar shapes, lines and colors. Consider the relationship of the figure (organic) in the structured (geometric) environment, and the shapes and lines with the edges of the 9x12 space.
•  Identify the positive and negative shapes in each of the sketches and draw a contour line around each shape with a black fine-tip marker. Explain your decisions to the class or smaller group. 

3. Using local color (the natural color of objects) (2-3 hours) 

•  Refer to the three selected photographs/sketches and examine the colors. Are they repeated or similar? Do you see complimentary colors? 
•  Identify and mix the major colors. Select a limited pallet (2-4) colors from specific color harmonies: Complementary, Analogous, Triad, Tetrad or Split-complement. Black and white may be used and mixed with pure hues to achieve tints and shades.
•  Transfer each of the three line compositions to clean sheets of paper. Use light pencil lines that can be easily covered with paint or erased,
•  Use different size and shape paintbrushes, and apply the color to the corresponding shapes with one coat of fluid paint. Apply the paint with short, repeated, visible brushstrokes. Use a different technique with each painting, such as filling each shape with color or leaving spaces between the brushstrokes. Recognize the patterns produced with repeated mark-making. The brushwork technique should be consistent in each painting.

4. Create an original painting that reflects a personal style 
    “Well the first stroke really says who you are.” –S. Pace: (3-6 hours)

•  Select one of the three compositions and the brushwork technique you prefer. (The preferred composition and brushwork may not be the same painting.) Explain your decision to the class or smaller group. Create two 9”x12” paintings of the selected composition in the preferred style. Vary the size of your brushes. Repeating this technique will make it your own and familiarize you with the forms in the composition. This composition will be enlarged.
•  Create the painting on an 18”x24” format. (The kind of paint may dictate the surface material - heavy white paper, primed canvas, gessoed paper. Tape paper to a flat surface allowing a 1/4”-1/2” border.) The paint will be applied directly. No preliminary drawing on the canvas/paper. Consider the size and shape of your brushes for the larger format. The paint should be fluid. If it wants to drip, let it! Carefully remove the tape from the dry, completed painting. 
•  Compare the final 18”x24” painting and three 9”x12” paintings to the original line drawing and photograph.
•  A student many want to create more than one larger painting of other compositions.


OPTIONAL JOURNAL/NOTEBOOK:

•  Document an interview the individual(s) depicted in the painting about their occupation and lifestyle.

•  Write a two-page essay about the occupation that prompted the painting.

•  Write a list of 10-15 adjectives, verbs and nouns that describe that work or the worker. Select six words from the list and write a five-line poem incorporating those six words.


OPTIONAL WRITING ACTIVITIES: (1/2 - 2 hours each)

•  Write a two-paragraph description of the landscape that prompted the painting.

•  Write a list of 10-15 adjectives, verbs and nouns that describe that landscape. Select six words from the list and write a five-line poem incorporating those six words.


OPTIONAL FIELD TRIP: 

•  Field trip to local museum or gallery to see Pace’s original works. See Sources/
Resources link for listing of museums and galleries.


STUDIO ENVIRONMENT : 

•  Students take an active responsibility in the learning environment:
•  Use time productively 
•  Be considerate of others in the class 
•  Participate appropriately in class discussions and group activities
•  Clean up workspace and equipment, and return materials to their proper place

EXHIBITION : 

•  Exhibit the work:
•  Display the completed painting with preliminary photograph/sketch and the journal/notebook

ASSESSMENT : 

•  Students should be assessed on the following:
•  Completion of DVD viewing and post-viewing assignments
•  Participation in related discussions
•  Completion of research and documentation
•  Completion of initial drawing and brushwork exercises
•  Level of completion of final painting(s):
•  Creative Process
•  Craftsmanship & Form
•  Demonstrated Understanding of Subject & Content
• Effort & Progress•  Use of project-specific vocabulary
•  Appropriate use of time, materials and studio space

LESSON PLAN 3



THE FAMILY:
CELEBRATING MOMENTS

Time: 11-18 hours

DESCRIPTION / OBJECTIVES:
Through a study of their family, students will document and create imagery and compositions that reflect their personal observations of family members engaged in work, play or “ordinary moments”. The compositions will emphasize the inter-relationship of the figure(s) with each other and their environment. Students will engage in a creative process that will lead to an original, abstract painting that addresses the subject with a selected painting medium using bold brushstrokes to develop forms. 

MATERIALS: 

•  Paper
•  9”x12” for 5-8 preliminary paintings
•  Heavy-weight 18”x24” for final painting•  or Primed Canvas: 18”x24”
•  Gesso for priming paper (optional) 
•  Pencil
•  Black fine line marker
•  Variety of Brushes: large bamboo, medium and large round & flat
•  Paint: Tempera or Acrylic 
•  Acrylic Matt Medium (if using Acrylic paint)
•  Masking Tape
•  Pace Painting Images: : 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 37, 39, 40, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55

PROCESS: 

1.Research and document the family (3-6 hours)

•  Interview family members about their work, life-style, each other, and history (past and present). Encourage family stories.
•  Visit work/play sites of family members.
•  Collect family photographs (past & current).
•  Take photographs or make sketches of family members in their environment: home, work, play, and “ordinary moments” engaged in their work.
•  Record information.

2. Draw what you saw! (1-1/2 hours)

•  Return to the Art Studio and create three, quick, 9”x12” sketches from photographs and on-site sketches. “I don’t paint what I see. I paint what I saw.” –S. Pace 
•  Select images or sections of the images – compositions that use the space effectively – and communicate the relationship between the family members. Look for repeated or similar shapes, lines and colors. Consider the relationship of the figure(s) with each other, the shapes that create their environment, and the relationship of the shapes and lines with the edges of the 9x12 space. 
•  Identify the positive and negative shapes in each of the sketches and draw a contour linearound each shape with a black fine-tip marker. Explain your decisions to the class or smaller group.

3. Using local color (the natural color of objects) (2-3 hours) 

•  Refer to the three selected photographs/sketches and examine the colors. Are they repeated or similar? Do you see complementary colors? Select colors that will communicate the relationship between the family members and other elements in the environment. 
•  Identify and mix the major colors. Select a limited pallet 2-4 colors from specific color harmoniesComplementary, Analogous, Triad, Tetrad or Split-complement. Black and white may be used and mixed with pure hues to achieve tints and shades.
•  Transfer each of the three line compositions to clean sheets of paper. Use light pencil lines that can be easily covered with paint or erased.
•  Use different size and shape paint brushes, and apply the color to the corresponding shapes with one coat of fluid paint. Apply the paint with short, repeated, visible brushstrokes. Use a different technique with each painting, such as filling each shape with color or leaving spaces between the brushstrokes. Recognize the patterns produced with repeated mark making. The brushwork technique should be consistent in each painting. Variety may be achieved with different size and style brushstrokes.

4. Create an original painting that reflects a personal style 
    “Well the first stroke really says who you are.” –S. Pace: (3-6 hours)

•  Select one of the three compositions and the brushwork technique you prefer. (The preferred composition and brushwork may not be the same painting.) Explain your decision to the class or smaller group. Create two 9”x12” paintings of the selected composition in the preferred style. Vary the size of your brushes. Repeating this technique will make it your own and familiarize you with the forms in the composition. This composition will be enlarged.
•  Create the painting on an 18”x24” format. The kind of paint may dictate the surface material (heavy white paper, primed canvas, gessoed paper). Tape paper to a flat surface allowing a 1/4"-1/2” border.) The paint will be applied directly. No preliminary drawing on the canvas/paper (separate sketches only). Consider the size and shape of your brushes for the larger format. The paint should be fluid. If it wants to drip, let it! Carefully remove the tape from the dry, completed painting. 
•  Compare the final 18”x24” painting and three 9”x12” paintings to the original line drawing and photograph.
•  A student many want to create more than one larger painting of other compositions.

OPTIONAL JOURNAL/NOTEBOOK:

•  The journal/notebook may be a document of the process that includes the initial photo or sketch, the contour drawings, all preliminary paintings, interviews, research, written documentation, and other writing activities.

OPTIONAL WRITING ACTIVITIES: (1/2 - 2 hours each)

•  Document family stories, and create a short story based on one of those stories.
•  Write a list of 10-15 adjectives, verbs and nouns that describe that family member of event. Select six words from the list and write a five-line poem incorporating those six words.

OPTIONAL FIELD TRIP: 

•  Field trip to local museum or gallery to see Pace’s original works. See Sources/Resources link for listing of museums and galleries.

STUDIO ENVIRONMENT: 

Students take an active responsibility in the learning environment:
• Use time productively 
• Be considerate of others in the class 
• Participate appropriately in class discussions and group activities
• Clean up workspace and equipment, and return materials to their proper place

EXHIBITION: 
Exhibit the work:
•  Display the completed painting with preliminary photograph/sketch and the journal/notebook

ASSESSMENT: 

Students should be assessed on the following:
•  Completion of DVD viewing and post-viewing assignments
•  Participation in related discussions
•  Completion of research and documentation
•  Completion of initial drawing and brushwork exercises
•  Level of completion of final painting(s):
•  Creative Process
•  Craftsmanship & Form
•  Demonstrated Understanding of Subject & Content
•  Effort & Progress  / Use of project-specific vocabulary
•  Appropriate use of time, materials and studio space

SOURCES / RESOURCES

• Acme Fine Art 
38 Newbury Street, 4th Floor
Boston, Massachusetts 02116
617-585-9551
info@acmefineart.com
www.acmefineart.com

• Courthouse Gallery of Fine Art 
6 Court Street
Ellsworth, Maine 04605
207-667-6611
info@courthousegallery.com
www.courthousegallery.com

• Evansville Museum of Art, History and Science 
Curator of Education
11 SE Riverside Dr.
Evansville, IN 47713
812-425-2406
Stephanie@emuseum.org
www.emuseum.org

• Farnsworth Art Museum 
16 Museum Street
Rockland ME 04841
(P) 207-596-6457
farnsworth@midcoast.com
www.farnsworthmuseum.org

• Fryeburg Academy 
Palmina F. and Stephen S. Pace Galleries
745 Main St.
Fryeburg, ME 04037
207-935-2001
jday@fryeburgacademy.org
www.fryeburgacademy.org

• Katharina Rich Perlow Gallery 
41 E. 57th St.
New York, NY 10022
212-644-7171
PerlowGallery@aol.com
www.artnet.com

• Maine College of Art 
The Stephen and Pam Pace House
c/o The Office of the President
522 Congress St. 
Portland, ME 04101
207-699-5012
lwoodbury@meca.edu
www.meca.edu

• Stephen Pace, by Martica Sawin 
Hudson Hills Press LLC
3556 Main St.
Manchester, VT 05254
802-362-6450
artbooks@hudsonhills.com
www.hudsonhills.com

• Turtle Gallery 
61 N. Deer Isle Road • Route 15
Deer Isle, Maine 04627
207-348-9977
www.turtlegallery.com

• University of Southern Indiana
Kenneth P. McCutchan Art Center
Palmina F. and Stephen S. Pace Galleries 
Dean, College of Liberal Arts 
8600 University Boulevard 
Evansville, IN 47712-3596 
812/464-1855
www.usi.edu

RETURN TO TOP

Stephen Pace Paintings that Appear in the Film


Click on a painting in the list below to view or project it individually.

1. Three Islands in Fog, Stephen Pace, 1963, oil on canvas, 55x72
2. Family at Home, Stephen Pace, 1988, oil on canvas, 60x84
3. Family with Goat, Stephen Pace, 2002, watercolor on paper, 28x40.5
4. Racing Home, Stephen Pace.
5. Five Black Horses Crossing Field, Stephen Pace, 2003, oil on canvas, 32x42
6. Three Horses Alarmed, Stephen Pace, 2000, oil on canvas, 42x60
7. Four Brothers at Cornfield, Stephen Pace, 2004, watercolor on paper, 41x27
8. Three Black Horses, Stephen Pace, 2006, oil on canvas
9. Three Horses Moonstruck, Stephen Pace, 1990, oil on canvas, 30x40
10. Two Horses Encounter, Stephen Pace, 2003, oil on linen, 42x30
11. Black and White Horses Racing, Stephen Pace, 2003, watercolor on paper, 22x30
12. Shucking Corn, Stephen Pace, 1985, oil on canvas, 43x72
13. Picking Watermelon, Stephen Pace, 1985, oil on canvas, 56x84
14. Title Unknown, Stephen Pace, 1970, oil on canvas
15. Mother, early drawing, Stephen Pace.
16. Myrna Loy, early drawing, Stephen Pace.
17. Magazine Copy, early drawing, Stephen Pace.
18. Robert Lahr, early drawing, Stephen Pace.
19. Self Portrait, early drawing, Stephen Pace.
20. Pam Pace, Stephen Pace, 1985, watercolor on paper
21. Pam Pace, Stephen Pace, 2005, watercolor on paper
22. Pam Pace, Stephen Pace, 1989, woodcut
23. Bridge Over the Seine, Stephen Pace, 1945, watercolor on paper
24. French Village, Stephen Pace, 1945, watercolor on paper
25. San Miguel Village, Stephen Pace, 1946, watercolor on paper
26. San Miguel Bridge, Stephen Pace, 1946 watercolor on paper
27. Mexico, Stephen Pace, 1946, oil on canvas, 26x23
28. Title Unknown (Mexico), Stephen Pace, 1946, oil on canvas
29. 55-21, Stephen Pace, 1955, oil on canvas, 48x68
30. Pace/Lobdell Painting, Paris, Stephen Pace, 1951, oil on canvas, 76x51
31. Untitled, Stephen Pace, 1951, oil on canvas, 72x53
32. Untitled #52-52, Stephen Pace, 1952, oil on canvas, 48x32
33. Untitled #57-?, Stephen Pace, 1957, oil on canvas
34. Untitled #59-A14, Stephen Pace, 1959, oil on canvas, 59x51
35. Untitled #59-83, Stephen Pace, 1959, oil on canvas, 66x78 _
36. Untitled #54-?, Stephen Pace, 1954, oil on canvas
37. The Avery Family, Stephen Pace, 1965, oil on canvas,
38. Untitled #61-W30A, Stephen Pace, 1961, watercolor on paper, 22.5x30.75 
39. Untitled #58-W12A, Stephen Pace, 1958, watercolor on paper, 22x30 
40. Untitled #58-W5A, Stephen Pace, 1958, watercolor on paper, 22x30 
41. Monhegan Island, Stephen Pace, 1959, watercolor on paper, 22x30.25
42. After the Drawing Session, Stephen Pace, 1973, oil on canvas, 72x92
43. Meredith in Maine, Stephen Pace, 1972, oil on canvas, 24x36
44. Front Porch with Hat, Maine, Stephen Pace, 1978, oil on canvas, 44x66
45. Apple Tree at Greenhead, Stephen Pace, 1980, oil on canvas, 45x70
46. Artist Sketching Gardener, Stephen Pace, 1981, oil on canvas, 42x70
47. Jan and Weigelia, Stephen Pace, 1990, oil on canvas, 46x34 
48. Sedgwick Blueberry Fields, Stephen Pace, 1981, oil on canvas, 42x70 
49. Pam with Chanterelles, Stephen Pace, 1993, oil on canvas,, 60x42
50. Genghis Grooming, Stephen Pace, 1982, oil on canvas, 18.5x12.5
51. Window Gazing with Ghengis, Stephen Pace, 1993, oil on canvas, 42x52
52. Young Artist – First Snowfall, Stephen Pace, 1983, oil on canvas, 42.5x30.5
53. Grandparents, Stephen Pace, 2007, watercolor on paper
54. Three Horses, Stephen Pace, 2007, oil on canvas
55. Grandparents, Stephen Pace, 2004, oil on canvas, 60x50
56. Downeast Couple, Stephen Pace, 1963, oil on canvas, 55X95
57. Two Clam Diggers in Green, Stephen Pace, 2001, watercolor on paper, 22x30
58. Clam Digger in Yellow and Purple, Stephen Pace, 2001, oil on canvas, 42x60
59. Lobster Fisherman, Stephen Pace, 1976, oil on canvas, 40x48
60. Selecting Lobster, Stephen Pace, 1998, oil on canvas, 30x36
61. Propping Sunflowers, Stephen Pace, 2004, oil on canvas, 48x72
62. Clam Digger at Sunset, Stephen Pace, 1984, oil on canvas, 72x90
63. Shephard House, Stephen Pace, 1972, watercolor on paper, 22x30 
64. Racing Home #2, Stephen Pace, 1987, oil on canvas, 52x72 
65. Pulling Lobster Traps, Stephen Pace, 1989, oil on canvas, 48.5x72.5 
66. Loading from Baithouse, Stephen Pace, 1989, oil on canvas, 60x72 
67. Red Schooner, Stephen Pace, 2007, watercolor on paper 
68. Ames Lily Pond #2, Stephen Pace, 2002, watercolor on paper, 28x40.5 
69. Title Unknown, Stephen Pace, 1991, watercolor on paper
70. At the Lily Pond, Stephen Pace, 2003, oil on canvas, 42x60

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